Pedro Avalos Jr.

  • posted about 2015 LA Bike Ped Count Report Release on Facebook 2016-11-18 09:15:09 -0800
    Results are in! @AARPCA and @LACBC release 2015 #LABikePedCount report #bikeLA

    2015 LA Bike Ped Count Report

    bike+ped_2015.pngLACBC is excited to release results from the 2015 Los Angeles Bicycle and Pedestrian Count, presented by AARP. Since 2009, LACBC has organized biennial citywide counts to collect, analyze, and share reliable data with public and government agencies on walking and biking. This time, we went bigger than ever by adding 40 locations, requiring 647 volunteer shifts to count at 156 distinct locations. In total, our volunteers counted nearly 21,000 people biking and 140,000 people walking over six hours. We owe an incredible debt of gratitude to our volunteers and our partners, including Los Angeles Walks, the UCLA Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies, and community organizations all across Los Angeles.

    This report comes at a time of important policy shifts in the City of Los Angeles. Every year, over 200 people are killed on city streets in traffic crashes, about half of them while walking or biking. In 2015, Mayor Eric Garcetti signed Executive Directive 10, making Los Angeles a Vision Zero city and calling for all city departments to work together to end all traffic deaths by 2025. The City Council adopted this same policy goal to make safety the City’s top transportation priority as part of Mobility Plan 2035. To achieve Vision Zero, L.A. Department of Transportation is working to catalog all serious and fatal traffic crashes and deploy proven engineering solutions to prevent them. Just recently, L.A. County voters overwhelmingly approved Measure M, also known as the “Los Angeles County Traffic Improvement Plan.” Measure M will provide approximately $120 billion over 40 years for transportation projects across L.A. County, including $4 billion for biking and walking. In this report, LACBC analyzed collision data along corridors where bike lanes were installed and found that bike lanes are a key strategy for making streets safer--for people who bike and for all people using the roads. 

    NEW_HIN.jpg

    The report found that top 30 (20%) count locations account for over 65% of people who walk and 55% of people who bike. Most of these locations are located on top of the City’s High Injury Network, which indicates that people walking and biking on these streets are more likely to be injured or killed by traffic collisions. All of these locations are located in high-density neighborhoods, near major destinations, or in low-income communities of color. Almost all of the top 30 locations were in neighborhoods with median household incomes below the rest of the city. People walk and bike to access important neighborhood destinations like local businesses, services, transit stations, schools, and parks, many of which are located on the High Injury Network. Making walking and biking safe and convenient requires making infrastructure improvements on the streets where people are walking and biking.

    NEW_commuters.jpg

    In 2015, riders continued to gravitate towards bike lanes; however the count shows an overall 9% year-by-year decline in same location ridership from 2013 to 2015. In the last two years, bike lane installation has decreased significantly from a high of 101 miles in fiscal year 2013 to only 11 miles in fiscal year 2015. Many of these new lanes have been installations where bike lanes could be included in other road resurfacing or safety projects, rather than installations along high priority corridors identified in the Bicycle Plan. Of the initial 183 miles of bike lanes prioritized in the 5-year Bicycle Plan Implementation Strategy, only 45 miles (25%) have been installed. As a result, the bike network in Los Angeles remains fragmented with large gaps in bike lanes along most riders’ trips. This lack of connectivity continues to be the greatest barrier reported by many people who bike or would like to.

    NEW_ridership.jpg

    Bike lanes have made streets safer, but more work needs to be done. On the new bike lanes studied, bike ridership increased by 62% after installation. After accounting for increases in bike ridership, new bike lanes reduced bicycle crash risk by an average of 42%.

    Furthermore, adding bike lanes by instituting a road diet has shown more safety benefits and resulted in a higher ridership increase than adding bike lanes without reducing the number of travel lanes. For example, a road diet on Colorado Boulevard in Eagle Rock, installed in 2013, has seen a 26% ridership increase whereas bicycle-automobile collisions decreased by 87% and auto collisions by 19%. Similarly, the 7th street bike lanes in Downtown Los Angeles demonstrated a strong ridership increase by 53% after installation in 2011, while collisions rates for all road users on the street decreased.

    NEW_road-diet.jpg

    Women Want Safer Biking Options. In Los Angeles, women make up just 16% of cyclists overall, but the gender disparity is lowest on streets with quality bikeways (bike paths at 22% and bike lanes at 17%) and highest on streets with no bicycling infrastructure. Cities with safer streets for bicycling in general tend to have smaller gender disparities in bicycling, such as Portland, Oregon (35%), and Copenhagen, Denmark (50%).

    NEW_women.jpg
     
    You can read our three recommendations and detailed methodology about the analysis in the full report. 

    Sign up below to to download the full report!


    If you have any question about the report and #LABikePedCount, please email at count@la-bike.org

    Thank you to our sponsors, partner organizations, and 400+ volunteers who helped complete the 2015 #LABikePedCount! Check out this storify for fun pictures!

     

    Sign up

  • posted about Support Using Measure M Local Return to Make Streets Safe & Equitable on Facebook 2016-10-26 09:45:45 -0700
    I will #VoteYesOnM to #makeLACounty bikeable, livable & connected for all. Will you? @lacbc

    Measure M Local Return

    136 votes

     MeasureM-Logo-1.jpg

    Measure M Passes! (November 8, 2016)

    Together, we’ve done it! We’ve helped pass Measure M and secured a sustained funding source for walking and bicycling projects throughout Los Angeles County.

    The Measure M campaign has shown us that a strong and diverse coalition of groups can come together and rally behind something that affects us all. Transportation brought together organizations with a variety of core missions that include public health, expanding business, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and of course, bike issues. On top of that, Measure M’s passage demonstrates L.A. County residents’ desire to create real transportation options.

    While we celebrate the success of our campaign to #MakeLACounty bikeable, livable, and connected, we’re building on that momentum and already planning the next steps needed to ensure our tax dollars are spent on projects that matter to us. Through Measure M’s local return, cities receive money to spend on transportation projects. At LACBC, we’re targeting that at least 10% of that local-return be spent on projects to improve walking and bicycling.

    It is crucial for you, our supporters, to be involved in working with your city council on this set-aside for active transportation. Please stay tuned to our emails as we get this process started. Sign up to be a member and join our continued efforts to #MakeLACounty a healthy, safe, and fun place to bike. Thank you for your support.


    What is Measure M? 

    Measure M, known as the “Los Angeles County Traffic Improvement Plan,” is a half-cent sales tax ballot measure that L.A. County residents voted to pass on November 8, 2016. The measure will provide approximately $120 billion over 40 years for transportation projects. Of that money, over $4 billion is set aside for walking and biking. Measure M will give Los Angeles County its first sustained source of funding for walking and biking projects.

     

     


    Why support Measure M?

     

    Measure M will #makeLACounty...

    bikeable2.jpg
    Measure M will take Los Angeles County to the next level of bicycle infrastructure. For example, bicycling from the Valley to Long Beach on the Los Angeles River will finally be made possible, by connecting through the downtown section of the Los Angeles River from the Elysian Valley to Maywood.
    livable2.jpg

    With Measure M, communities will become more livable with better amenities for people who walk and bike. With sustainable local funding, cities will be able to make streets safer for all people who want to age, live, work and play in place. More livable communities means better quality of life for you and everyone you love.
    connected2.jpg
    Not only will Measure M further connect Los Angeles County by expanding our rail network, but it will link communities to each other. You will have more reliable and efficient options to get to the people and places that matter. Measure M will bring Los Angeles County together.

    More on Measure M:

    Pledge your vote

  • commented on Los Angeles River Ride FAQ 2016-05-19 12:12:25 -0700
    I’m currently an LACBC member and my membership expires on 09/2016. I registered for the LA River Ride back in 02/2016. Will I get another LACBC membership card in the email since all LA River Ride paid fees include 1-year of membership?
  • donated 2015-09-06 06:40:36 -0700

connect

get updates

Liquid syntax error: Error in tag 'subpage' - No such page slug site.signup_page